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The value of craftsmanship: techniques, nanimarquina

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An article targeting interior designers and architects that explains the different ancestral techniques used by the design company nanimarquina to produce handmade rugs.  

The value of craftsmanship: techniques

The creation of handmade rugs is a fascinating subject that sparks many people's interest and admiration because it preserves and gives life to a millenary cultural legacy: from dhurries, kilims, hand-tufted and hand-knotted rugs to embroidery. The art of rug weaving requires great skill and knowledge of various ancestral techniques. The choice of the technique and materials used determines the rug’s purpose and finish.

The following is a summary of the main techniques used at nanimarquina. This was the artisanal process that Nani Marquina herself fell in love with back in 1992 when she decided to travel to Asia, explore the ancestral techniques of each region and later move her entire production to India, Pakistan and Nepal.

 

Hand-knotted – Handmade on a vertical loom on which the thread is tightly knotted to the warp, this traditional technique from India, Iran, Pakistan, Tibet, Turkey and the entire Caucasus region is a slow and costly process (the knots are tied one by one, row by row) that enables highly-detailed designs to be created. The more knots there are, the greater the rug's density, pattern definition, durability and, consequently, value.

The shape and thickness of the knot (Turkish knot, Persian knot, Indo-Nepalese or Sumak) are what differentiate the different types of hand-knotted rugs. The Persian method is the most traditional and each knot must be cut by hand. An example of this technique is the Persian collection, a durable, high-density rug of unsurpassed exquisiteness to the touch. The Indo-Nepalese technique employs a rod for faster knot-cutting. This is the technique used in the Chillida collection, a series of pieces with a great pictorial and visual strength. And Sumak is a weave in which the threads are knotted in the warp, making the rug appear to be made up of braids.

Hand loomed – Made on a vertical or horizontal loom where the weft threads are interwoven with those attached to the warp loom, this traditional technique allows for a wide range of finishes, from simple, fine designs involving cut pile or loop, to more elaborate textures. It is used to create dhurries, flat-structured rugs originating in India. An example of this is the nanimarquina Tres collection, a display of transparency in which the structure of the weave is shown almost pedagogically and without fear of revealing the warp.

The hand-loomed technique is also used to create kilim rugs. Originally from central Asia, these thin, pile-free rugs are known for their high density, durability, strength and lightness. One of the main differences between kilims and dhurries is that the weft in a kilim is much tighter and denser. These rugs are presented in a variety of colours and often in geometric patterns. An example of this technique is the Losanges rug designed by the Bourullec brothers: this unique piece consists of 13 colours perfectly blended in a composition of different-sized rhombuses.

Hand tufted – This weave can be used to create rugs in a variety of formats, patterns and pile heights. A hand-tufting gun is used to inject the threads onto a fabric that has previously been stretched across a frame. Wool is the fibre traditionally used in tufting due to its excellent properties and high resistance. These high-density and durable rugs are ideal for busy areas.

Curves and flowing patterns can be woven using this technique, allowing drawings and graphic designs to be transferred accurately. This is the case of Troupe or Silhouette, two rug collections that reflect the work of artist and designer Jaime Hayon, being the closest thing to creating from a blank canvas. In addition, tufting rugs provide natural thermal and even acoustic insulation by trapping air between their fibres, absorbing sound and reducing noise levels.

An article targeting interior designers and architects that explains the different ancestral techniques used by the design company nanimarquina to produce handmade rugs.  

The value of craftsmanship: techniques

The creation of handmade rugs is a fascinating subject that sparks many people's interest and admiration because it preserves and gives life to a millenary cultural legacy: from dhurries, kilims, hand-tufted and hand-knotted rugs to embroidery. The art of rug weaving requires great skill and knowledge of various ancestral techniques. The choice of the technique and materials used determines the rug’s purpose and finish.

The following is a summary of the main techniques used at nanimarquina. This was the artisanal process that Nani Marquina herself fell in love with back in 1992 when she decided to travel to Asia, explore the ancestral techniques of each region and later move her entire production to India, Pakistan and Nepal.

Hand-knotted – Handmade on a vertical loom on which the thread is tightly knotted to the warp, this traditional technique from India, Iran, Pakistan, Tibet, Turkey and the entire Caucasus region is a slow and costly process (the knots are tied one by one, row by row) that enables highly-detailed designs to be created. The more knots there are, the greater the rug's density, pattern definition, durability and, consequently, value.

The shape and thickness of the knot (Turkish knot, Persian knot, Indo-Nepalese or Sumak) are what differentiate the different types of hand-knotted rugs. The Persian method is the most traditional and each knot must be cut by hand. An example of this technique is the Persian collection, a durable, high-density rug of unsurpassed exquisiteness to the touch. The Indo-Nepalese technique employs a rod for faster knot-cutting. This is the technique used in the Chillida collection, a series of pieces with a great pictorial and visual strength. And Sumak is a weave in which the threads are knotted in the warp, making the rug appear to be made up of braids.

Hand loomed – Made on a vertical or horizontal loom where the weft threads are interwoven with those attached to the warp loom, this traditional technique allows for a wide range of finishes, from simple, fine designs involving cut pile or loop, to more elaborate textures. It is used to create dhurries, flat-structured rugs originating in India. An example of this is the nanimarquina Tres collection, a display of transparency in which the structure of the weave is shown almost pedagogically and without fear of revealing the warp.

The hand-loomed technique is also used to create kilim rugs. Originally from central Asia, these thin, pile-free rugs are known for their high density, durability, strength and lightness. One of the main differences between kilims and dhurries is that the weft in a kilim is much tighter and denser. These rugs are presented in a variety of colours and often in geometric patterns. An example of this technique is the Losanges rug designed by the Bourullec brothers: this unique piece consists of 13 colours perfectly blended in a composition of different-sized rhombuses.

Hand tufted – This weave can be used to create rugs in a variety of formats, patterns and pile heights. A hand-tufting gun is used to inject the threads onto a fabric that has previously been stretched across a frame. Wool is the fibre traditionally used in tufting due to its excellent properties and high resistance. These high-density and durable rugs are ideal for busy areas.

Curves and flowing patterns can be woven using this technique, allowing drawings and graphic designs to be transferred accurately. This is the case of Troupe or Silhouette, two rug collections that reflect the work of artist and designer Jaime Hayon, being the closest thing to creating from a blank canvas. In addition, tufting rugs provide natural thermal and even acoustic insulation by trapping air between their fibres, absorbing sound and reducing noise levels.

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